Good use of colours when thinking about Colour Deficiency

Color Oracle menu with view of colour palette
Color Oracle menu for making a choice of colour filter.

 Bernie Jenny from Monash University in Australia has developed Color Oracle as a free colour deficiency simulator for Windows, Mac and Linux. When designing any software, apps or websites it allows you to check the colour choices.

This download works on older operating systems as well as the latest ones using Java, but it is important to follow the developer’s instructions for each operating system. It is very easy to use on a Windows machine where the app sits in the system tray and can be used at any time when testing colour options by selecting an area on the screen.

Another trick when designing web pages or other documents is to view them in grey scale or print them out to test readability.

This strategy comes thanks to Andy Eachus at University of Huddersfield.

Accessibility Maze Game

maze game screen grabIf you want to learn about digital accessibility in a fun way try the Accessibility Maze Game developed by The Chang School, Ryerson University in Ontario, Canada. It takes a bit of working out and you may not get to all the levels but have a go!

When you have managed to get through the levels there is a useful “What you can do to Remove Barriers on the Web” pdf downloadable ebook telling you all about the issues that you will have explored during the Accessibility Maze Game. These are all related to W3C Web Cotent Accessibility Guidelines but presented in ten steps.

The ebook is available in an accessible format and has been provided under Creative Common licencing (CC-BY-SA-4.0)

SCULPT for Accessibility

SCULPT process thanks to Digital Worcester – Download the PDF infographic

Helen Wilson has very kindly shared her link to SCULPT for Accessibility. Usually we receive strategies that relate to student’s work, but in this case, this is a set of resources that aim “to build awareness for the six basics to remember when creating accessible documents aimed at the wider workforce in a local authority or teachers creating learning resources.”

It seemed at this time whilst everything was going online due to COVID-19 this was the moment to headline the need to make sure all our work is based on the principles of accessibility, usability and inclusion. JISC has provided a new set of guidelines relating to public service body regulations and providing online learning materials. Abilitynet are also offering useful links with more advice for those in Further and Higher Education

Windows 10 support for Visual Impairment

YouTube online access

If you are supporting students or want to learn more about the way Microsoft Windows 10 provides built in assistive technologies to support visual impairments Craig Mill and CALL Scotland have a blog on the subject and Craig has made a YouTube playlist. All the videos have captions and the transcripts are readily available.

The videos are short bite-sized guides and comprise of the following topics:

  • Part 1: Customising the desktop using some simple adjustments in Windows 10.
  • Part 2: Magnifying information in apps – some useful hints and tips on zooming in and out of browsers and other apps.
  • Part 3: Customising Mouse Tools and Pointer – how to make changes to the Mouse Pointer using Windows ‘legacy’ tools.
  • Part 4: Using keyboard shortcut keys to increase the font size in Microsoft Word – improving speed and workflow.
  • Part 5 (a): Using Immersive Reading tools in Microsoft Word to customise the font / text and listen to it spoken aloud.
  • Part 5 (b): Using Learning Tools in Microsoft Edge Browser to customise font/text, layout and hear it read aloud.
  • Part 6: Introduction to Microsoft Ease of Access Tools Display Settings – how to ‘Make text size bigger’, ‘Make everything bigger’ and how to adjust the mouse pointer size and colour.
  • Part 7: Using Windows Magnifier – how to use Windows Magnifier in combination with other Ease of Access Display Settings such as ‘Make everything bigger’ etc.
  • Part 8: Colour filters – maximising computer accessibility for learners who experience colour blindness.
  • Part 9: High Contrast Filter – how to customise the colours of elements such as menu bars, backgrounds, buttons etc, in Windows.
  • Part 10 (a): Microsoft Narrator – an introduction to using screen reading with Windows Narrator.
  • Part 10 (b): Using Windows Narrator to navigate the desktop and Microsoft Word.

Visolve for checking colours and

Visolve showing colours of a logoThe Visolve webpage or download allows you to check to see if colours are sufficiently distinguishable from each other.  This can help those with  colour vision deficiency or colour blindness.  You can upload an image and it will provide you with the original view and other selected options such as Red-Green transform, Blue-Yellow transform, Saturation increase, Red, Yellow, Green or Blue filter and with added hatching.

Visolve is also available as an app for iPhones or on Windows and Mac.desktop computers.

This strategy is linked to Alexander studying for a distance learning MBA

Free Apps to assist with colour deficiency issues in a pharmacy lab, with graphs and dissection

Here are some useful, free applications I came across for a needs assessment I have just completed.

colour blind assistantColorblind Assistant –  PC – Hover mouse over pixel in any running application – Excel/Powerpoint/PDF/Word etc, and the program displays the colours name.

“Colorblind Assistant is free software that instantly picks the color from the mouse pointer, providing you with a written name of the color, as well as other useful data such as RGB values and bar graphs, brightness and saturation.” It is available as an Android app on Google Play.

color ID appColor ID Free – iPhone and Android – Point phone or tablet device at any object and software displays name of currently viewed colour.

“Color Identifier uses the camera on your iPhone or iPod touch to speak the names of colors in real-time. It’s an Augmented Reality app for discovering the names of the colors around you!”

My student was a Pharmacology student who was having difficulty with graphs, lab equipment, dissection. Tested the phone app with various items I had around, and it was very good. As it is on a portable device, it is ideal for lab/field work.

 

Tim Symons | Training Co-ordinator/Needs Assessor/AT Trainer | Access SUMMIT