iTunes U free app – open courses useful for extra information

course title

contents

slidesThe iTunes U app from the Apple Store has lots of open courses.  It is very useful for my studies – you can listen to the course at the same time as looking at the slides in iBooks.

Henry – Web and Internet Science

It works on an iPhone and iPad – you need to register on the Apple store. Many of the courses are American. ‘Internet Economics’ as a lecture is an example from one of the courses and you have a podcast plus slides from Stanford University – “Future of the Internet by Ramesh Johari”  You can speed up the voice up to 2x, pause the lecture and return to it later and rewind in short steps.

Coach’s Eye – Thinking Olympics – sports and practicals – video annotation

Coach's Eye app“Coach’s Eye is an iOS5 app available through iTunes for £3 that can be used on the iPhone iPad and iPod. It allows you to add audio and visual feedback to new and imported videos. Particularly useful for sports and performing arts although it could be used with providing feedback on any visual practical process e.g. silversmithing techniques. For some good examples of the app in use watch the YouTube video

The swimming and karate kick examples are fairly good.”

Kevin Brunton, Going mobile, apps and devices (download docx) ADSHE.

Colours for Presentations

“It wasn’t until I had my vision tested that I discovered I had a green colour deficiency and so colour overload is a problem, such as occurs in some pie-charts. I tend to use blue as this is usually a safe colour for presentations and when developing web pages if you have a colour deficiency – blue, pale colours.  When items are highlighted, the text goes white on a blue background.


To show you how this looks I have made a PowerPoint presentation about colour deficiencies – it is available for download from Slideshare.”

Jim – Computer Science.

Slowing mouse speeds

Optical mouse“One major issue I have had since the start of my schooling life is, when my hands quickly cramp up and I cannot write or hold a pen without extreme discomfort. This has meant that whilst note taking and exams as examples, I find it difficult to write.  I have slowed down the mouse speed.  With my shakes I end up double-clicking everything.  Also, I can only use an optical mouse and I can’t use a touchpad…”

Jim – Information Technology in Organisations

Linearise layout of tables and presentations for screen reader users

“If certain things aren’t designed in a way which is friendly towards my screen reader, if I struggle to navigate pages of notes or what have you, then I find I just give up. …It very rarely happens, but there have been times, like for the last year we had presentations we had to do for French. Otherwise we used to have to produce a sheet that went with the presentation, like a document, and I used to have to get that e-mailed to me. Now if there were tables in that, you had to set them out in a very standard way, you couldn’t have a non-standard table, one of those funny shaped things, you’d have to have just a plain table. If you’d pulled it off a website, well fine, but then edit it, because otherwise I can’t read it.” David –  Politics and French

WebAim provide very good examples alongside their articel on Creating Accessible Tables

“Here is a table which was created for visual effect:

toilet in a table

The visual user will read: “Basement Toilets Must Flush UP!”

The screen reader will hear (or feel via Braille): “Basement UP! Toilets Flush Must”