Use StudyBlue App to Create Review Flashcards

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Studyblue testing

StudyBlue testing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

StudyBlue is a great virtual learning tool in creating flashcards for an efficient and effective review session. It’s capable of increasing your retention skills by creating cards with embed pictures, texts, and recorded speech.

As a student, I have maximised the tool in all my subjects, especially in my majors. When reviewing, I always organise my notes and convert them into flashcards, especially when separating business subjects such as Accounting and Economics from the technology-focused courses. In my creative writing classes, I basically use my flashcards to enrich my vocabulary, improve grammar, and check spelling.

With StudyBlue App, you can enjoy:

  • Tailored flashcards
  • Measuring your progress
  • Integrating pictures
  • Audio recordings

On top of all, StudyBlue gives you the liberty of mastering a subject based on your own terms. Whilst the monthly subscription fee of £6.12 is expensive for a virtual card solution, the free version already does the job, especially in developing your skills in information retention.

Back in my time, it was limited as web-based tool. The developers have released a mobile counterpart for smartphone or tablet for the students of today to enjoy. If you‘ve used Evernote in note taking, you can easily import them to StudyBlue to create your review material. But if you’re a new iPhone user, can easily use the handset’s iCloud feature to sync your notes and convert them into learning cards. O2’s page for the iPhone 5c stated that this Apple service allows users to share and access files across all your iDevices. This makes file transferring more efficient nowadays.

Get it here for iOS, Android, and Web.

The YouTube video below is a good starting point for using the tool:

(courtesy of Learn German with Herr Antrim)

About the Author
Jennifer Birch – a former Business Information Systems and Creative and Professional Writing at UEL. Reach her on Techie Doodlers and Twitter.

Autograph in trial mode for box and whisker plots.

“I simply went onto Google and wrote in ‘Autograph’ and downloaded the trial version – this is 30 days and is free, or you can pay for a proper version. I believe if you get the trial version, you can still use all the functions.

Box and Whisker plot

Normality Box Plot

For the purposes of my essay I needed to use a box and whisker plot, something that is very difficult to do on Excel! I used mean data from Excel, to create the is box and whisker plot.  To create a box and whisker plot you open up Autograph, and click on the button FILE- then new 1D statistics page – Then right click anywhere on the grid and click the button enter raw data- you should see a column that is named Data with an ‘x’ below- enter your means from Excel by copying and pasting into the column which is marked with an ‘x’ above- then press OK- after this in the bottom left hand corner- you should have a caption saying ‘RAW DATA 1’ right click this and then pick the option ‘Box and Whisker Diagram’ it will then create your box and whisker plot!

You can then play around, changing colour, you can also click on the screwdriver button –  (in yellow) and then click’ labels’- this will allow you to put axis and label them.

I have only used it very basically as this was the purpose for my assignment- but I am sure the more you play around with it- the more charts and options you will have.”

Hannah  course : Prof. Prac. in Health Sciences, University of Southampton

Here is a YouTube version –Box and Whisker Plot in Autograph

MyScript Calculator for handwritten calculations

“I really like the way I can scribble a maths equation on my iPhone and it will recognise my writing and then give me the answer!”

writing equation

recognising script

 

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MyScript Calculator is free and can be downloaded onto an iPad, iPhone or Android tablet or phone.  It is easy to use and copes with quite complex mathematical operations.

Rumi – RCAST, University of Tokyo

Easy Bib app for iOs and Android tablets and phones

Easy Bib appTeena has passed on advice about the EasyBib app for students that find it incredibly difficult or time consuming to provide a reference for written assignments. This free and useful iPad,iPod and iPhone 4 app is available through iTunes or as an Android app from Google Play. It will do most of the hard work for you but we have found issues using certain devices – anything post iPad3 seems to work well.

Hover over the ISBN number of a book with a steady hand. The app will automatically scan the barcode, and providing you are connected to Wifi, will generate a bibliography reference for you. Three styles are available including Chicago, APA (Harvard) & MLA.

Once your reference has been generated, email it to yourself (singularly or in a group) with other references.

Teena from Oxford & Cherwell Valley College

Extra Note – Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.  There is also a useful introductory YouTube video on EasyBib iPhone and iPad App

 

AudioNote for iPad & iPhone

AudioNote screen grabsAudioNote is a fantastic note taking app. The official description from the app store tells you how you can synchronise notes and audio with each key point being linked to the moment when the lecturer talks about that subject.  Because it works on a tablet or phone there is no need to wait for the laptop to boot up.

Bookmarks can be created throughout the audio recording to highlight important points for easy referencing.  It allows you to take pictures and insert them into your notes and AudioNotes can be exported to Evernote, saved and organised there. A yellow background can be used instead of white for those with visual stress/sensitivity. It costs £2.99 and is available from the iTunes store.

This YouTube video is a good introduction to AudioNote

This comes with thanks to the Disability Advisory Service at Imperial College

Speech to Text app on a mobile

“I like to generate a transcript of a lecture session and I use speech to text to dictate into my mobile or I record the session”  D.T.

There are several ways of dictating and producing text on the mobile – iPhone has built in speech recognition (Siri) for many of its apps or the use of Dragon Dictation when online that allows short paragraphs to be dictated and collected within its own note pad. Android has Dragon mobile assistant and if you want to experiment there is Utter in beta mode for commands.  It does not make the Android totally hands free, but it shows the beginning of an off/online conversation with reactions!

utter! Android Voice Command Assistant – BETA! YouTube video